Should Web 2.0 Embrace Localization?

A tag cloud with terms related to Web 2.
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After reading Bernard Sunn’s blog post, “Re-Localization Opportunities – Local 2.0”  I thought how can Web 2.0 developers incorporate local business owners into their 2.0 business models?  Believe it or not, a world still exists outside of the blogosphere or Twittersphere.  The Internet is mainstream, but there is still a market of millions of people and who prefer to shop local and fellowship in person rather than in cyberspace.

So the question is – How can web 2.0 developers reach those consumers?  By somehow targeting local business owners who cater to this market, developers have access to consumers who would normally be off the radar.

I commented on Bernard’s though-provoking post:

What a great post. I too found it thought provoking. I predict that we will see more and more Web 2.0 applications incorporate GPS (annotated tagging) in a way that will pull consumers out to local stores, shops, etc. For example, how can BrightKite take its annotated, geo-tagging application and localize it? How can they partner with local business owners, and bring value to them via their application and local BrightKite users? It will be interesting to watch this trend develop.

Should web application developers incorporate locailization into their business models?  Or should they continue to focus on the cyberspace for revenue generation?

Re-Localization Opportunities – Local 2.0 – ReadWriteWeb.

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BrightKite, My New Favorite Mobile Application

iPhone screenshot of BrightKiteI started using Brighkite two weeks ago, and I can’t stop.  For some odd reason, I enjoy using BrightKite more than I do Twitter.  Don’t get me wrong – I really, really like using Twitter.  But, BrightKite is more about me – where I’m at (GPS), and what I’m doing (ability to post pics) at any given time.  Where as Twitter is primarily a platform for short status updates.  I can tell an annotated story with BrightKite – with Twitter? No not really.  In Chris Brogan’s post, “If I Owned Brightkite”, he discusses the untapped potential for BrightKite,

I see such potential in BrightKite, after using the iPhone application. The website is nothing nearly as nuanced and obvious. In fact, it’s fat and bloated. I’d strip it now that I’ve used the iPhone app. I’d make it closer to the experience that is so simple. (I understand the difference. The iPhone, by providing location information, makes the value far more obvious.)

How do I know it’s my favorite?  Well, last week I caught myself posting a note at 5:30 am before I headed out for my morning run.  Ok, really, who cares?  No seriously, who would be up at 5:30 am, that really cared about me going for a run? But BrightKite is so darn easy to use, why not post GPS-tagged photos about my drive to work, eating dinner at a restaurant, or reading a magazine at Barnes and Noble?  Which I did, with ease.

BrightKite used my Twitter profile to connect me with my friends from Twitter, who also used Brightkite.  Two were listed, Wayne Sutton and Chris Brogan, who both graciously accepted my invitation to connect on BrightKite.  (Thanks Wayne and Chris!)  To my delight I was able to see Wayne ride a Segway in an X-Mas parade, and Chris’ airport adventures in Arizona.  Both were like watching a movie in 3D, as opposed to Twitter, which is like watching it on tv – two totally different experiences.

Do you use BrightKite more than Twitter?

Add me to your friend list on BrightKite and Twitter!

My BrightKite profile online

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