Cloud Agents Bring Personalization for the User

ReadWriteWeb’s Sarah Perez blogged about a new Twitter app called Twitchboard in her blog post, The Rise of Cloud Agents.   The uniqueness of Twitchboard stems from its ability to tie together different services on the social web and automates their interactions.

What’s so fascinating to me is not the application Twitchboard, as I haven’t even tried it, but the concept ad ideal of the cloud agent.  Which is term that is ahybrid of two terms – cloud computing and intelligent agent.

After reading Tom Carroll’s comment on the post:

This is just another step toward the cognative economy. The services we see to day are providing the foundation of integrated behaviors. Eventually these cloud agents will mature from simple integration services to complex filters and autonomous extensions of our public persona.

I began to see Twitchboard for more than what is was and more for what it represeneted.  Here is my comment:

I haven’t tried Twitchboard. But, I wanted to comment because I don’t believe the hype is actually for the application (Twitchboard), than it is for the concept of the application – and what the future holds for social network’s connectivity and relevancy. I believe that Twitchboard and similar applications are headed in the direction of personalized service for the user. Service that is centered around context and the user and not the application or the social network. Only time will tell….

What do you think?  I think cloud agents will be a part of web 3.0 in a big way.  Not to say cloud agents Are web 3.0, but only that they will play a part in its functionality and relevance to the user.

What are your thoughts?

The Rise of Cloud Agents – ReadWriteWeb.

Advertisements

State of the Twittersphere – Q4 2008 Report

Hubspot has released its first-ever State of the Twitterspere report for Q4 2008.  The report summarizes the trends of Twitter users based on real data pulled from hundreds of thousands of Twitter profiles accessed through the reports generated by Twitter Grader.

I found that the report accurately reflects my Twitter profile.  For example, I currently have a Twitter grade of a 91, which based on the report, Twitter users with a score between 90-100 have an average of over 100 followers.  As of today, I have 169 followers and I’m following 180 people.

Are you on Twitter?  If not join today and connect with me.

Here is a link to the report: State of the Twittersphere – Q4 2008 Report.

Twitter in Real Life

For the Twitter users who have ever encountered this scenario, I though you would enjoy this cartoon I found on Hubspot’s blog.

The Follow-Back

Twitter In Real Life: The Follow-Back

What’s your opinion?  I always feel somewhat guilty if I don’t follow someone who follows me?

Creative Commons License “Twitter In Real Life” by HubSpot is licensed under aCreative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.
Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

BrightKite, My New Favorite Mobile Application

iPhone screenshot of BrightKiteI started using Brighkite two weeks ago, and I can’t stop.  For some odd reason, I enjoy using BrightKite more than I do Twitter.  Don’t get me wrong – I really, really like using Twitter.  But, BrightKite is more about me – where I’m at (GPS), and what I’m doing (ability to post pics) at any given time.  Where as Twitter is primarily a platform for short status updates.  I can tell an annotated story with BrightKite – with Twitter? No not really.  In Chris Brogan’s post, “If I Owned Brightkite”, he discusses the untapped potential for BrightKite,

I see such potential in BrightKite, after using the iPhone application. The website is nothing nearly as nuanced and obvious. In fact, it’s fat and bloated. I’d strip it now that I’ve used the iPhone app. I’d make it closer to the experience that is so simple. (I understand the difference. The iPhone, by providing location information, makes the value far more obvious.)

How do I know it’s my favorite?  Well, last week I caught myself posting a note at 5:30 am before I headed out for my morning run.  Ok, really, who cares?  No seriously, who would be up at 5:30 am, that really cared about me going for a run? But BrightKite is so darn easy to use, why not post GPS-tagged photos about my drive to work, eating dinner at a restaurant, or reading a magazine at Barnes and Noble?  Which I did, with ease.

BrightKite used my Twitter profile to connect me with my friends from Twitter, who also used Brightkite.  Two were listed, Wayne Sutton and Chris Brogan, who both graciously accepted my invitation to connect on BrightKite.  (Thanks Wayne and Chris!)  To my delight I was able to see Wayne ride a Segway in an X-Mas parade, and Chris’ airport adventures in Arizona.  Both were like watching a movie in 3D, as opposed to Twitter, which is like watching it on tv – two totally different experiences.

Do you use BrightKite more than Twitter?

Add me to your friend list on BrightKite and Twitter!

My BrightKite profile online

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]